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HISTORY OF SYSTEMIC RACISM ON LONG ISLAND 

How do we build a just Long Island?

Report addressing structural racism on Long Island

The Color of Law

Covers early history of housing discrimination on Long Island

A Decade of Change: Growing School Segregation on Long Island

A report on education equity on Long Island

Diasporas In Suburbia: Long Island’s Recent Immigrant Past

History & census data on the racial makeup of Long Island

Making a Way to Freedom; a History of African Americans on Long Island by Lynda R. Day

In her discussions of family and community life in freedom, the economics of free black life, recreation, Black military service, Day makes a real contribution by culling facts from dozens of little known local histories, memoirs, travel books, and from a close reading of the federal census. Day ably accounts for the
increasing assertiveness of Black people on Long Island during the Civil Rights movement and up to the present moment.

Long Island Divided, Newsday Investigative Report of Housing Discrimination

Three year undercover investigation into discrimanatory housing practices on Long Island

How did Long Island become so segregated—and what can be done about it?

Research on the benefits of racially intergrated learning enviornments.

Long Island Racial Equity through Economic Advancement

Several in-depth studies affirm the impact of these disparities on black Long Islanders’ economic well-being.

Civil Rights on Long Island By Christopher Claude Verga on behalf of the African American Museum of Nassau County

Long Island has been in the corridors of almost all major turning points of American history, but Long Island has been overlooked as a battleground of the civil rights movement. This book examines the history housing discrimination in Levittown, and the collective efforts from organizations such as Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) who employed civil disobedience as a tactic to fracture racial barriers.

Source compiled by Local Historian, Sandra Riaño  @s.riano

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